Dissolving Views and Slow Movies. William Friese-Greene: Close-Up, Part 8

‘Midway between photography and cinema’ In this post I suggest that after his failed experiment with the King’s Road test in 1893, William Friese-Greene gave up on the idea of a camera that would take 10 or more pictures per second, regularly spaced on perforated film, and the projection onto a screen at that rateContinue reading “Dissolving Views and Slow Movies. William Friese-Greene: Close-Up, Part 8”

The King’s Road – historiography of a film test. William Friese-Greene: Close-Up, Part 7. 

In the previous post in this series I explained how portrait photographer William Friese-Greene, following the collapse of his partnerships and in the turmoil of his first bankruptcy, was looking for a studio in the fashionable area of Chelsea, London. He found it on the King’s Road, where his wife Helena set up shop. FromContinue reading “The King’s Road – historiography of a film test. William Friese-Greene: Close-Up, Part 7. “

Animated Portraits, Opal Photographs and A Woman Kept in the Dark. William Friese-Greene: Close-Up, Part 6.

Animated Portraits Our previous post in this series took us to the Photographic Convention of 1890 at Chester, where William Friese-Greene showed a one- or two-second sequence of photographs in motion, using a hidden 12-photo double-wheel projector devised and specially built by his mentor J.A.R. Rudge. We now need to slip back a few years.Continue reading “Animated Portraits, Opal Photographs and A Woman Kept in the Dark. William Friese-Greene: Close-Up, Part 6.”

A film screening in 1890? And, Up in a Balloon (Maybe). William Friese-Greene: Close-Up, Part 5

Chester Town Hall: the 1890 Photographic Convention Opposite the Town Hall three children play in the gutter: two boys sporting straw boaters and a younger child, perhaps a girl. Three portraits of innocents in the street. They stop to observe the photographer, his camera and his tripod, hesitant. The older boy is thoughtful, hand onContinue reading “A film screening in 1890? And, Up in a Balloon (Maybe). William Friese-Greene: Close-Up, Part 5”

Cousin Alfred and Little Bertie. William Friese-Greene: Close-Up, Part 4

In our previous post we looked at Frederick Varley’s ‘3-D’ camera, Varley’s career and experience, and some aspects of stereoscopic photography in the 19th century. This time we take an in-depth look at a fragment of an original stereoscopic Hyde Park sequence taken by Friese-Greene. The recreation of such Hyde Park scenes entranced the night-watchContinue reading “Cousin Alfred and Little Bertie. William Friese-Greene: Close-Up, Part 4”

Frederick H. Varley and 3-D ‘movies’. William Friese-Greene: Close-Up, Part 3

We need new Subscribers so … if you would like to support this blog, please Subscribe now, and let your colleagues and friends know about this independent and free source of new research in the fields of historic optical media: for academics, collectors, media archaeologists, private researchers, and anyone else interested in these engaging subjects.Continue reading “Frederick H. Varley and 3-D ‘movies’. William Friese-Greene: Close-Up, Part 3”

Mortimer Evans: in the shadow of an ‘Inventor’. William Friese-Greene: Close-Up, Part 2

In the shadow of Friese-Greene Last time we looked at the first ‘moving picture’ cameras constructed for and used by William Friese-Greene. We also touched upon the involvement of design engineer Mortimer Evans. Why has so little been made of this other name during the century (and more) that William Friese-Greene’s claims for success haveContinue reading “Mortimer Evans: in the shadow of an ‘Inventor’. William Friese-Greene: Close-Up, Part 2”

Early motion picture discovery: Photographic discs from the 1890s (Part 3)

The discovery In 2020, a box of discs and plates relating to an early motion picture system was discovered in the USA. The owner Eli Nesmith, who inherited the material from his aunt and uncle, has been generous enough to allow details, images, and animations to be released on The Optilogue. The first part ofContinue reading “Early motion picture discovery: Photographic discs from the 1890s (Part 3)”

Early motion picture discovery: Photographic discs from the 1890s (Part 2)

The story so far: Before photographic motion pictures became commonplace, back in the late 1890s, the moving images weren’t always based on film. For amateur and semi-professional use, tangly strips of celluloid were considered by some to be a hindrance to the spread of the medium. Some inventors devised systems that recorded a sequence ofContinue reading “Early motion picture discovery: Photographic discs from the 1890s (Part 2)”

Early motion picture discovery: Photographic discs from the 1890s (Part 1)

Before photographic motion pictures became commonplace, back in the late 1890s, the technology was varied and is very interesting to researchers and collectors today. But the moving images weren’t always based on film. For amateur and semi-professional use in particular, tangly strips of celluloid were considered by some to be a hindrance to the spreadContinue reading “Early motion picture discovery: Photographic discs from the 1890s (Part 1)”

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