Cousin Alfred and Little Bertie. William Friese-Greene: Close-Up, Part 4

In our previous post we looked at Frederick Varley’s ‘3-D’ camera, Varley’s career and experience, and some aspects of stereoscopic photography in the 19th century. This time we take an in-depth look at a fragment of an original stereoscopic Hyde Park sequence taken by Friese-Greene. The recreation of such Hyde Park scenes entranced the night-watchContinue reading “Cousin Alfred and Little Bertie. William Friese-Greene: Close-Up, Part 4”

Frederick H. Varley and 3-D ‘movies’. William Friese-Greene: Close-Up, Part 3

We need new Subscribers so … if you would like to support this blog, please Subscribe now, and let your colleagues and friends know about this independent and free source of new research in the fields of historic optical media: for academics, collectors, media archaeologists, private researchers, and anyone else interested in these engaging subjects.Continue reading “Frederick H. Varley and 3-D ‘movies’. William Friese-Greene: Close-Up, Part 3”

Revealed: The World’s First ‘3-D’ Film Show (Part 2)

The principle explained Following his successful public show, Theo set out his principle of monocular stereoscopy in considerable theoretical detail in The Optician. He explained that conventional stereoscopic photography had apparently overshadowed other possibilities of introducing depth in pictures by taking advantage of little-known facts of depth perception. ‘The principle of the stereoscope is doubtlessContinue reading “Revealed: The World’s First ‘3-D’ Film Show (Part 2)”

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