Cinema, Television, and a Curious Parallel. William Friese-Greene: Close-Up, Part 11

“The confidence game […] is an exercise in soft skills. Trust, sympathy, persuasion. The true con artist doesn’t force us to do anything; he makes us complicit in our own undoing. He doesn’t steal. We give. He doesn’t have to threaten us. We supply the story ourselves. We believe because we want to, not becauseContinue reading “Cinema, Television, and a Curious Parallel. William Friese-Greene: Close-Up, Part 11”

Theodore Brown, and the Little Green Man of the Sea

The picture above is from a 1920s book written and (as we shall see) drawn and published by the English inventor, editor and artist Theodore Brown. The technique of ‘changing and moving pictures’ using red-and-green printing and gelatine filters had appeared years earlier, in Brown’s pocket-money novelty the Pocket Kinematograph. DISCLAIMER: One of the imagesContinue reading “Theodore Brown, and the Little Green Man of the Sea”

 Colour, and the Courts. William Friese-Greene: Close-Up, Part 10

X-Rays: the New Photography William Friese-Greene was always ready to latch onto anything new. This applied to Röntgen Rays, the amazing development in photography better known now as X-Rays. In 1896 he obtained an X-Ray kit, and was booked to give theatrical demonstrations. He delegated most of those, and his dabbling in the emerging scientificContinue reading ” Colour, and the Courts. William Friese-Greene: Close-Up, Part 10″

1896, and the Afterlife of the ‘Master Patent’. William Friese-Greene: Close-Up, Part 9

As shown towards the end of this post, with a 1900 patent Friese-Greene had a suggestion for a smallish portable projection viewing box. His film device was for domestic, or coin operated, use. The general idea would later be developed by others, for salesmen to display items to their clients, as this Kodak advertisement shows.Continue reading “1896, and the Afterlife of the ‘Master Patent’. William Friese-Greene: Close-Up, Part 9”

Book Review – Pictures of Poverty: the Works of George R. Sims and Their Screen Adaptations

Lydia Jakobs, Pictures of Poverty: The Works of George R. Sims and Their Screen AdaptationsKINtop Studies in Early Cinema – vol. 7John Libbey Publishing Ltd, Herts, UK, 2021Paperback: ISBN 0-86196-752-0, £31.00 (US$39.00)276 pages, 57 black & white and colour illustrations Reviewed by Richard Crangle At a time when social inequality is back in all itsContinue reading “Book Review – Pictures of Poverty: the Works of George R. Sims and Their Screen Adaptations”

Dissolving Views and Slow Movies. William Friese-Greene: Close-Up, Part 8

‘Midway between photography and cinema’ In this post I suggest that after his failed experiment with the King’s Road test in 1893, William Friese-Greene gave up on the idea of a camera that would take 10 or more pictures per second, regularly spaced on perforated film, and the projection onto a screen at that rateContinue reading “Dissolving Views and Slow Movies. William Friese-Greene: Close-Up, Part 8”

The King’s Road – historiography of a film test. William Friese-Greene: Close-Up, Part 7. 

In the previous post in this series I explained how portrait photographer William Friese-Greene, following the collapse of his partnerships and in the turmoil of his first bankruptcy, was looking for a studio in the fashionable area of Chelsea, London. He found it on the King’s Road, where his wife Helena set up shop. FromContinue reading “The King’s Road – historiography of a film test. William Friese-Greene: Close-Up, Part 7. “

War in Europe: Victory in Kodachrome

Continuing our occasional look at photographs in Kodachrome, this time it’s a story from the Second World War. I wrote the following review of Max Hastings’ book Victory in Europe in 1985, for the British Journal of Photography. It was early days for the public viewing of Kodachrome war footage, which would form the basisContinue reading “War in Europe: Victory in Kodachrome”

Animated Portraits, Opal Photographs and A Woman Kept in the Dark. William Friese-Greene: Close-Up, Part 6.

Animated Portraits Our previous post in this series took us to the Photographic Convention of 1890 at Chester, where William Friese-Greene showed a one- or two-second sequence of photographs in motion, using a hidden 12-photo double-wheel projector devised and specially built by his mentor J.A.R. Rudge. We now need to slip back a few years.Continue reading “Animated Portraits, Opal Photographs and A Woman Kept in the Dark. William Friese-Greene: Close-Up, Part 6.”

A film screening in 1890? And, Up in a Balloon (Maybe). William Friese-Greene: Close-Up, Part 5

Chester Town Hall: the 1890 Photographic Convention Opposite the Town Hall three children play in the gutter: two boys sporting straw boaters and a younger child, perhaps a girl. Three portraits of innocents in the street. They stop to observe the photographer, his camera and his tripod, hesitant. The older boy is thoughtful, hand onContinue reading “A film screening in 1890? And, Up in a Balloon (Maybe). William Friese-Greene: Close-Up, Part 5”

Create your website with WordPress.com
Get started